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Dec 2017
Vol 14 No 4
BACK ISSUES


Problem Based Learning – 1,2,3

By Hal Portner
 


Problem Based Learning – Part 1 – (Part 2, Part 3 are linked at bottom of page)

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Do you want your students to develop high-level communication skills? The ability to arrive at informed judgments? The ability to function in a global community? Flexibility, persistence, and resourcefulness? Try Problem-Based Learning.

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We are continually faced with a series of great opportunities brilliantly disguised as insoluble problems.…John W. Gardner, founder of Common Cause

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Do you want your students to develop

  • High-level communication skills?
  • The ability to arrive at informed judgments?
  • The ability to function in a global community?
  • Flexibility, persistence, and resourcefulness?

 

study tools general drawingProblem-Based Learning (PBL) has the potential to help your students acquire these and other skills needed in the 21st century.PBL is a set of instructional strategies and techniques characterized by the use of ‘real world’ problems as a context for students to learn critical thinking and problem solving skills while acquiring essential concepts of the curriculum.

Here is the PBL process.

  • 1. Throughout their discussion, students pose questions to each other and you, their teacher, on aspects of the problem they do not understand. These issues are recorded by the group. You encouraged students to define what they know, and more importantly, what they don’t know.
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  • 2. Students rank, in order of importance, the issues generated. They decide which questions or issues will be followed up by their whole group. They also determine which can be assigned to individuals who will later share with the entire group. You and your students discuss what resources will be needed in order to research the issues and where they could be found.
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  • 3. When students reconvene, they summarize and integrate their findings into the context of the problem. They continue to define new issues as they progress through the problem and in the process, learn that learning is an ongoing process, with new issues to be explored.
  • What is your role as the Teacher in PBL?

    In PBL, you act as facilitator and mentor. Ideally, you guide, probe and support students’ initiatives, not lecture, direct or provide easy solutions. However, the degree to which you make the process student-directed versus teacher-directed is your decision based on the size of the class and the maturity of the students. The goal is, of course, to have your students take responsible roles in their own learning.

    A critical factor in the success of PBL is the problem itself. In part 2, I will discuss the characteristics of good PBL problems and provide some examples. Meanwhile, here are a couple of related web sites you may want to check out.

    http://www.studygs.net/pbl.htm

    http://www.usc.edu/hsc/dental/ccmb/usc-csp/index3.htm

    Click below to read Problem Based Learning Part 2

    click here

     

     

     

    Pages: 1 2 3



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    This entry was posted on Friday, February 1st, 2013 and is filed under *ISSUES, February 2013, Hal Portner. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.
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