Chatboards
Mailrings
Classifieds
Lessons
Jobs
Harry Wong
Projects
Live!
Gazette
Advertise
SUBSCRIBE | SUBMIT
Jan 2017
Vol 14 No 1
BACK ISSUES


10 Career Path Tips to Guide Your Students

By Perry Binder, J.D.
 



In the sage words of Yogi Berra, “if you don’t know where you’re going, you’ll be lost when you get there.” Picking a career path boils down to a cost benefit analysis and a gut check. It is a game of reality versus passion, and your students can start blazing a meaningful path in high school.

But hopefully students can appreciate that every career has an arc, and they aren’t even at the beginning of the curve. Don’t be surprised if their career direction changes significantly a few times before and after they reach the peak.

With that message in mind, here are my 10 career path tips to guide your students:

1. Don’t let anyone crush your dreams. However, the riskier your dream, the better your backup plan must be.

2. There is a huge difference between a childhood dream and a dream job. If you dreamed of being a lawyer since the age of twelve, you better make sure you know exactly what attorneys do on a given twelve hour work day. Did You Know: In a survey of 800 attorneys, only 55 percent reported being satisfied with their career.

3. Make sure your dream job is not an avocation (a hobby). An avocation is a vacation from a vocation, because the pay ranges from little to nothing.

4. No matter what your part-time jobs or summer jobs are, always be thinking about how those experiences will enhance your resume and work skills.

5. The most important thing for deciding on a major or career path is to get out of the classroom and into an internship which exposes you to the day-to-day ups and downs of that profession. “Learning by doing” will give you a better appreciation of the job than learning through textbooks.

6. Do what you love but don’t let your career choices jeopardize anyone you love. Including yourself. Translation: Take care of others but don’t forget to take care of yourself, sometimes before others. Listen to our airline flight attendants: “Put your own oxygen mask on first before assisting others with their masks.”

7. Determine whether you are driven to be your own boss or if you crave the stability of a steady paycheck. Assess your personality traits and the risks inherent with both paths. (e.g., the risk of putting up your own money as your own boss versus the risk of losing a job in a company you work for) Did You Know: The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics lists occupations with the largest job growth projected through the year 2018, starting with registered nurse.

8. Rather than casually asking career advice from parents or other relatives, set up a time to interview them, with prepared general and specific questions. This approach will make them think more thoughtfully about their responses, and may reveal their personal career challenges and triumphs.

9. Don’t rely on luck or fate in your career. Professional success is about putting yourself in a position to create numerous opportunities.

10. Over the course of your lifetime, there may only be a handful of impactful career opportunities. Assemble an inner circle team of advisors now, so you’ll be able to act quickly to objectively assess the pluses and minuses of future opportunities.

And finally, clean up your social media presence online! What’s publicly available might not bode well for your future employment. Did You Know: In 2011, the Federal Trade Commission approved the practice of employers conducting social media background checks going back seven years for job applicants.

.
Perry Binder is a legal studies professor at Georgia State University. His career path tips are from his book, 99 Motivators for College Success, along with other tips on his 99 Motivators blog.

A version of this article appeared in The Huffington Post.

 

 



Comment on this article...

Next Article...
 
This entry was posted on Saturday, September 1st, 2012 and is filed under *ISSUES, Perry Binder, September 2012. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.
Teachers.Net Gazette Vol.9 No.9 September 2012

Harry & Rosemary Wong: Effective Teaching
Learning, Laughing, and Leaving a Legacy


Cover Story by Bill Page
Alternatives to Failing Your Students


More Teacher Articles...
»10 Career Path Tips to Guide Your StudentsPerry Binder, J.D.
»Be Proactive in Your Communications With ParentsSteve Reifman
»Featured Lesson: The Election of 1824Teachers.Net Community
»A Reflection of Me: Why My Students Disrespected MeAndrea Cleveland
»Reviving Ziggy Stardust and Coming of Age OR: The Dye is CastTodd R. Nelson
»The Race for Space: Apollo 11 (Written for Students)Artie Knapp
»Obstacle House! by Brains and Brawn - A Product ReviewNews Desk
»Collaborative Learning: Unlocking a New Era in EducationNews Desk
»History Through Picture Books - School Visits by Michael DoolingNews Desk
»How To Teach Essay Writing for Self-Directed Progress in High SchoolSusan L. Lipson
»Karen's PreK Page for SeptemberKaren Cox
»Book Review: Total Teaching: Your Passion Makes It Happen by Dr. Tom StaszewskiNews Desk
»About September...And a Free Calendar by TimTim.comTim Newlin
»Learning Climate - Motivation is optimal when coercion is at a minimumMarvin Marshall
»Behavior Intervention Ideas by FunctionLisa Bundrick, LMSW
»To Tell the Truth - When Children LieLeah Davies
»Quantity over Quality--The Problem with Writing Instruction in Our SchoolsSusan L. Lipson
»How to Retain New TeachersHarry K. & Rosemary Wong
»Calling All Early Childhood Educators! It’s Time To Shake Up Your Professional Development!Mary Broadbent Sullivan
»The Benefits of Music Therapy for Children With Special Needs - Linda JohnsonNews Desk
»Bloomer’s Blog - Days in the Life of Assistant Principal Todd BloomerTodd Bloomer
»Music Teachers Release Album for Kids - Teaches Musical ConceptsNews Desk
»Living Green Video Now Available FREE OnlineArtie Knapp
»A Month of Writing Prompts for SeptemberJames Wayne
»New Book: Making Art Special - A Curriculum for Special Education Art, Second Edition, by Helen Goren ShaftonNews Desk
»Apple Seeds - Quotes for EducatorsBarb Stutesman
»Today is... Special Days in SeptemberRon Victoria

By State
AL   AK   AZ   AR   CA   CO   CT   DE   DC   FL   GA   HI   ID   IL   IN   IA   KS   KY   LA    ME   MD   MA   MI   MN   MS   MO   MT   NE   NV   NH   NJ   NM   NY   NC   ND   OH   OK   OR   PA   RI   SC   SD   TN   TX   UT   VT     VA   WA   WV   WI   WY